Outten & Golden: Empowering Employees in the Workplace

Posts Tagged ‘domestic violence’

Pro-Working People Laws Catching on Around the Country

Friday, January 5th, 2018

As the new year begins, New York, Nevada and Washington state are implementing paid family leave laws, and Rhode Island will join them in July. Rhode Island will bring the total number of states with a paid family leave law to eight. 

NPR breaks down the legislation going into effect relating to paid family leave:

Washington on Monday became the seventh state—in addition to Washington, D.C.—to require employers to offer paid sick leave to their workers. Rhode Island is set to become the eighth to do so later this year, when its own law takes effect in July.

Meanwhile, New York has joined the small handful of states that require employers to provide paid family leave benefits. There, as NBC reports, employees will eventually be entitled to up to 12 weeks a year once the law takes full effect.

And in Nevada, employers are now required to offer up to 160 hours of leave per 12-month period to workers who have been—or whose family members have been—victims of domestic violence.

Similarly, states are taking proactive steps to help raise wages for working families. Across the country, 18 states and 20 local governments raised their minimum wage on Jan. 1. The following were included in the wave of states that increased their minimum wage: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington.

AFL-CIO Policy Director Damon Silvers explained the importance of raising the minimum wage:

It puts money in motion. We’ve seen the distribution of income and wealth skew very much to the top of the income scale. The fact is that rich people don’t spend money the way that middle-class and poor people do, and that makes our economy weak. Raising the minimum wage puts more money in the hands of people who need to spend it.

This blog was originally published at AFL-CIO on January 4, 2018. Reprinted with permission. 

About the Author: Kenneth Quinnell is a long-time blogger, campaign staffer and political activist. Before joining the AFLCIO in 2012, he worked as labor reporter for the blog Crooks and Liars.

New Pages to wrap up 2014!

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

Paula Professional CroppedTo wrap up 2014 Workplace Fairness has added 105 new pages to keep you informed about the latest developments in employment law.

We now offer detailed information, by state, on the processes for filing a workers compensation claim, and for filing an unemployment claim. Find out how to file a claim in your state, what deadlines you might face, and what benefits you may be eligible for.

In our Discrimination section we’ve added a new page on genetic information discrimination, including the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA”).  As technology progresses by leaps and bounds, new issues of privacy and discrimination can come up in the workplace.  This page answers questions that many workers may have about how accessible their genetic information is to employers.

In our Harassment section our new page on the effects of domestic violence in the workplace helps victims of domestic violence to understand how their situation at home may affect their work and what rights they have when they are treated negatively because of it.

Finally, in our Unions and Collective Action section we’ve added information about the 24 states that currently have right-to-work laws, and what that means for workers.  This page provides an explanation of what right-to-work laws are, and what they mean for workers in states that have instituted them.

Paid Sick Days

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

In November 2008, almost 70 percent of Milwaukee voters approved an ordinance granting paid sick days to every worker in the city. But the paid sick days ordinance has not yet been implemented in Milwaukee because of a legal challenge from the business lobby.

Two weeks ago, a judge’s ruling in the case caused the will of the voters to be further delayed. Judge Thomas Cooper ruled that a provision granting paid sick time to help protect the safety of survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking was not “rationally related to the overall objectives of the ordinance.”

His ruling shocked advocates for those who have lived the reality of domestic abuse.

Read the reaction of Milwaukee residents Jennifer and Peter Buffet, co-chairs of the NoVo Foundation of New York, in an op-ed printed in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel this week — “Sick Pay Law Should Cover Abuse Victims,” http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/48927532.html.

Judge Cooper DID uphold paid sick days as a basic labor standard. He rejected the arguments of the business lobby that the ordinance was unconstitutional. And he essentially validated the hard work and dedication of the Milwaukee Paid Sick Days Coalition, led by the members of the Milwaukee Chapter of 9to5, National Association of Working Women.

But for too long, victims of domestic violence have been blamed for their plight and the Buffet’s op-ed shows why this ruling should not be allowed to stand as precedent.

About the Author: Linda Meric is Executive Director of 9to5, National Association of Women, which helps strengthen women’s ability to achieve economic justice. 9to5 has staffed offices in Wisconsin, Colorado, California and Georgia and activists in cities across the country.

This article originally appeared in 9to5.org. Re-printed with permission from the author.

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