Outten & Golden: Empowering Employees in the Workplace

Posts Tagged ‘New York Domestic Workers’ Bill’

NY's Domestic Worker Bill of Rights

Tuesday, June 8th, 2010

Workers Comp Insider LogoIn the 1930s, when the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) passed, these two laws offered labor protections to workers nationwide – with the exception of two large segments of the work population: domestic workers and agricultural workers. These groups were excluded in the interests of political expediency since a large proportion of both groups were comprised of blacks and women, two populations that weren’t generally afforded full rights in many public and social arenas at the time.

With the 33-28 vote passage of the New York State Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights in the Senate, New York is likely to become the first state in the union to remedy that. The Bill is not yet final law – first, the Senate bill needs to be reconciled with the bill passed by the state Assembly and then Governor Patterson must sign it.

Bill Number S2311D would “… amend the labor law, the executive law and the workers’ compensation law, in relation to establishing regulations regarding employment of domestic workers including hours of labor, wages and employment contracts.” The purpose of the bill is stated as being to: “… provide domestic workers with a Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights which would set out the responsibilities of employers and employees as well as rules for paid holidays, paid vacations and standard overtime.”

It’s estimated that there are about 200,00 domestic workers in New York, 93% of which are women and 95% of which are people of color. Because the Bill covers all domestic workers – both legal and illegal – it’s been fairly controversial. Opponents decry the increase in regulation, which some say will result in fewer jobs. Many opponents also bridle against any protection for illegal workers, feeling that offers a legitimacy. Proponents say that it will go a long way to regulating an industry that has no standards or oversight and afford basic worker rights to a largely ignored worker population. Many of those in favor of the bill also think that shedding light on some of unregulated business segments which have historically been magnets for undocumented workers will be an important step in coming to grips with the hiring of illegal workers.

In a column in the New York Daily News, Albor Ruiz notes the irony that although we trust these domestic workers with our children, our elderly parents and our homes, they are among the most exploited of society’s laborers. He cites a study by Domestic Workers United and DataCenter, which found that, “…26% of domestic workers make less than the poverty line or the minimum wage rate. Also, 33% say they have been abused verbally or physically, and half report working overtime but not being paid for it. Health insurance from their employer is a rare luxury – only 10% get it.”

From our viewpoint, we think all employers have the responsibility to provide a fair and safe workplace for all employees, regardless of the work population involved – legal, illegal, here in the US, or offshore in other countries. It’s simply the right thing to do. But for those who don’t share this value, it generally makes sense from a cost perspective, too. In our experience, doing the right thing by employees is less costly in the long run.

This blog originally appeared in WorkersCompInsider.com on June 7, 2010. Reprinted with permission.

About the Author: Julie Ferguson is an insurance industry consultant with more than 20 years experience developing and implementing communications programs for workers compensation, workplace health & safety, employee communications, and general insurance programs. She founded and serves as editor for the nation’s first insurance weblog, Lynch Ryan’s Workers Comp Insider. She also founded and manages HR Web Café, a weblog for ESI Employee Assistance Group; Consumer Insurance Blog for the Renaissance Insurance Group; and is one of the administrators of Health Wonk Review, a bi-weekly health policy carnival. If you have a question for Julie, you can reach her at jferguson@lynchryan.com.

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