Outten & Golden: Empowering Employees in the Workplace

Posts Tagged ‘Jobs Summit’

Putting People Back to Work and Obama's Jobs Summit

Thursday, December 3rd, 2009

The U.S. is now 24 months into the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Over the course of those two years, we have lost 8.1 million jobs and 17.5 percent of the workforce–27.4 million workers–are unemployed, underemployed, or have given up looking for work. Economists surveyed by Bloomberg forsee the unemployment rate remaining at above 10 percent well into the first half of 2010.

On the eve of President Obama’s Jobs Summit at the White House, SEIU Secretary-Treasurer and Change to Win Chair Anna Burger has a piece on the Huffington Post outlining a bold jobs plan to meet the demands of a 21st century economy:

“If we are going to come out of our current crisis stronger and better prepared for the challenges of a 21st century economy, we need someone to take charge, to focus–24/7–on job creation until we see results.

“It’s time for President Obama to empower the 21st century Francis Perkins, someone to speak for him and someone who has the authority across government to shake things up. It’s time to create a country that works for all of us. And that starts with jobs.

“Creating jobs isn’t rocket science. We just need the political will, courage and determination to make it happen.”

The jobs plan Burger laid out focuses on investments in public services and the private sector, a national job training program, and the need to pass the Employee Free Choice Act. Her plan also advocates for a “green bank” to fund energy-efficiency and renewables projects, as well as funding for infrastructure to help rebuild schools and roads. Read the entire plan here.

Burger will join 129 business, academic and government leaders at tomorrow’s Jobs Summit. Other labor labors in attendee will be Leo Gerard from the United Steelworkers, Joe Hansen from UFCW, the AFL-CIO’s Richard Trumka and AFT president Randi Weingarten.

Economist Paul Krugman, who will be at the White House jobs forum as well, shares his thoughts on how we can begin to right the wrongs of our economy in the NY Times this week. A large part the solution, according to Krugman? Not leaving workers out of the economic recovery–and the federal government actually creating jobs. “There’s a pervasive sense in Washington that nothing more can or should be done, that we should just wait for the economic recovery to trickle down to workers,” notes Krugman. “This is wrong and unacceptable.”

Krugman proposes direct public employment and employee incentives–such as a tax credit–to swell job creation.”All of this would cost money, probably several hundred billion dollars, and raise the budget deficit in the short run,” he writes . “But this has to be weighed against the high cost of inaction in the face of a social and economic emergency.”

More confirmed attendees of tomorrow’s jobs forum at TPM here.

*This post originally appeared in the SEIU Blog on December 2, 2009. Reprinted with permission from the author.

About the Author: Kate Thomas is a blogger, web producer and new media coordinator at the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), a labor union with 2.1 million members in the healthcare, public and property service sectors. Kate’s passions include the progressive movement, the many wonders of the Internet and her job working for an organization that is helping to improve the lives of workers and fight for meaningful health care and labor law reform. Prior to working at SEIU, Katie worked for the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) as a communications/public relations coordinator and editor of AMSA’s newsletter appearing in The New Physician magazine.

Obama Announces White House Jobs Summit

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Image: Mike HallThis morning, President Obama announced he will invite labor leaders, business executives, small business owners, economists and other financial experts to a special White House summit on jobs next month.

Obama says the summit will explore ways to slow the loss of jobs and quicken the pace of job creation at a time when the nation’s jobless rate is at 10.2 percent, its highest point since 1983. As Obama said,

We have an obligation to consider every additional responsible step that we can to encourage and accelerate job creation in this country.

Just this week, the AFL-CIO Executive Council met in Washington, D.C., to outline a national jobs creation strategy that AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka will announce Tuesday at a special Economic Policy Institute (EPI) jobs and economy panel and seminar. (Plan now to view the live webcast from 9-11:30 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 17, at www.aflcio.org/createjobs.)

The summit announcement came as a new report showed there were 502,000 initial claims for unemployment benefits last week. Dire as that is, it’s lower than expected and is the smallest number of first-time claims since January. But, according to Obama:

Even though we’ve slowed the loss of jobs—and today’s report on the continued decline in unemployment claims is a hopeful sign—the economic growth that we’ve seen has not yet led to the job growth that we desperately need.

EPI President Lawrence Mishel calls the announcement of the White House jobs summit “necessary and welcome.”

President Obama is right to say that we should take “every responsible step” to help put Americans back to work. With a double-digit unemployment rate and nearly 16 million Americans looking for work, we should take decisive action as quickly as possible to create jobs. High rates of unemployment damage our economy in ways that can take years, if not generations, to fix, by casting millions of families and children into poverty and making it difficult for our nation to invest for the future. President Obama’s focus on job creation is necessary and welcome.

Currently 15.7 million workers are jobless and when the unemployment and underemployment rates are combined they soar to 17.5 percent—more than 27 million workers.

A date for the summit will be announced soon.

This article originally appeared in AFL-CIO blog on November 12, 2009. Reprinted with permission from the author.

About the Author: Mike Hall is a former West Virginia newspaper reporter, staff writer for the United Mine Workers Journal and managing editor of the Seafarers Log. I came to the AFL- CIO in 1989 and have written for several federation publications, focusing on legislation and politics, especially grassroots mobilization and workplace safety. When my collar was still blue, I carried union cards from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, American Flint Glass Workers and Teamsters for jobs in a chemical plant, a mining equipment manufacturing plant and a warehouse. I’ve also worked as roadie for a small-time country-rock band, sold my blood plasma and played an occasional game of poker to help pay the rent. You may have seen me at one of several hundred Grateful Dead shows. I was the one with longhair and the tie-dye. Still have the shirts, lost the hair.

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