Outten & Golden: Empowering Employees in the Workplace

Archive for the ‘Independant Contractors’ Category

Trump’s administration considers rule that would make it easier for businesses to exploit workers

Wednesday, February 6th, 2019

The U.S. Department of Labor plans to propose a rule that would reexamine worker classification, redefining who is given certain labor protections and who is not.

The boom of the so-called gig economy — as seen in ridesharing apps like Uber and Lyft and others like TaskRabbit and DoorDash — have raised questions about whether people providing these services should be classified as entrepreneurs or as workers.

Paul Secunda, professor of law at Marquette University, said the motivation for an employer-friendly Department of Labor to explore worker classification is very clear.

“Obviously employers want as many workers as possible to be independent contractors for the reasons that they don’t have to pay benefits, they are not subject to employment laws, and are at a real disadvantage bargaining with their employers,” Secunda said.

Secunda said such a rule would have profound effects on workers.

“It almost comes across as arcane and who cares? But if you can’t be considered to be an employee then all these laws are beyond your reach. You can’t organize. You can’t get minimum wage or overtime. You can’t get the protections of employment discrimination law. You can’t get consumer protections when it comes to pensions and health insurance. It’s really damaging. Those in the Trump administration, who are pro-business in a way that I don’t know we’ve ever seen before, are focused on it as a way to make it less expensive for these large companies to have labor and not pay for it.”

Bloomberg Law broke the news that the department would be looking at the issue after a spokeswoman told the outlet it will update the joint employer rule and then look at worker classification.

There are different tests and factors to determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor. The National Labor Relations Act uses what is known as a common law definition based on how much control the employer has over the worker, including factors such as bringing your own tools to a job, whether you get a W-2 or Form 1099, and how much direction you receive on how to provide the service or product.

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, which the Labor Department administers and enforces, there is an economic realities test that asks how dependent someone is on the employer in question. The more dependent the person is, the more likely that person is an employee and not an independent contractor.

In January, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that the transportation service SuperShuttle was correct to call its airport van drivers contractors instead of employees. The NLRB said it was considered entrepreneurial opportunity since workers set their own schedules and have their own work vans.

Secunda said the ruling was a “radical departure” from the common law definition of employee that has been used under the NLRA for decades.

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“They’ve added a new factor called entrepreneurial opportunity which is nowhere to be found in any of the list of factors I’ve ever seen for the common law control. You could argue that some of these factors hint at such entrepreneurial control but it’s never been either discussed as the centerpiece of the test as it was in the SuperShuttle case nor has so much emphasis been put on it as it was in the SuperShuttle case,” Secunda said. “It is not just happenstance that this case was decided by the NLRB and then in the regulatory agenda you see the Department of Labor is thinking of trying to eventually change the definition or factor test in a way that is not surprisingly going to favor employers.”

One in five Americans is a contract worker, so the debate over who is an employee or contractor will only grow in importance. People who are considered freelancers, on-call workers, temp agency workers, and contractors increased from 10.5 percent to 15.8 percent between 2005 and 2015, according to Harvard and Princeton economists.

“It’s hard to believe people are running businesses working 60 hours a week and making $10,000 a year. It doesn’t sound like a good entrepreneur to me. It sounds like an employee who is being exploited.”

Many of these workers have pursued lawsuits in the past few years. A part-time driver sued Grubhub in 2015 and argued that he that was entitled to minimum wage, overtime pay, and reimbursement of expenses, since the company had a lot of control over his schedule. But last year, a U.S. District Court judge disagreed and said that because he never went through training, wore a uniform, or received performance evaluations, he wasn’t a traditional employee.

A federal judge ruled last year that Uber doesn’t have enough control over Uber Black, a limo service, to be considered an employer under the FLSA, since drivers are free to run personal errands, take naps, and smoke cigarettes between rides. In 2017, DoorDash, a food delivery company, reached a settlement with workers after they said they were misclassified as independent contractors. Although the agreement provided more protections for workers and clearer policies, it did not result in a change in worker status.

The online gig economy is “growing rapidly,” economists Seth D. Harris and Alan Krueger explain in a 2015 report on the modernizing labor laws. Harris and Krueger propose that there be a new legal category of workers called independent workers for people like Lyft drivers, who are neither traditional employees or independent contractors, since they have similarities to both categories. Although they can, in theory, choose when and whether to work, there are restrictions imposed by the company on how much they can charge customers. They suggest “extending many of the legal benefits and protections found in employment relationships to independent workers.”

Secunda said that although the department will likely argue that these workers are entrepreneurs, there isn’t necessarily evidence to suggest that is how they should be characterized. Due to low pay, some drivers work extraordinarily long shifts.

“I think their entire emphasis here, entrepreneurial opportunity, brings the gig workforce into play,” Secunda said. “That term micro-entrepreneur — the idea that these people who are running their own little businesses — it’s hard to believe people are running businesses working 60 hours a week and making $10,000 a year. It doesn’t sound like a good entrepreneur to me. It sounds like an employee who is being exploited. But that’s their argument.”

This possible change would come after recent victories for businesses. In December, a federal appeals court ruled that an Obama-era standard that says joint employers can be held responsible for labor law violations and must bargain with contract workers’ unions was too broad. McDonald’s has been one of the companies at the center of this issue, after workers filed 291 complaints accusing the company of retaliation for a strike in the form of reduced work hours, disciplinary actions, and interrogations.

In September, the National Labor Relations Board issued a business-friendly proposed rule for an updated standard on joint employer status under the National Labor Relations Act. Under this rule, an employer is a joint employer “only if it possesses and exercises substantial, direct and immediate control over the essential terms and conditions of employment and… in a manner not limited and routine.”

The Labor Department plans to update the joint employer rule soon. The Labor Department has also recently moved to encourage states to conduct drug tests for people seeking unemployment insurance, which labor experts say would accomplish nothing but humiliation and more hoops for low-income people seeking relief.

Meanwhile, House Democrats are focusing on the Labor Department’s handling of its proposed tip-pooling rule, after reports that the department moved to hide findings that the rule would rob workers of billions of dollars every year. On Friday, Reps. Bobby Scott (D-VA), Keith Ellison (D-MN) Mark Takano (D-OR), and Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) askedfor all economic analyses of the rule. Democrats have also called for an investigation into Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta after a Miami Herald report on his role in securing a plea deal for multimillionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was able to avoid prison despite allegations that he sexually abused dozens of girls.

This article was originally published at ThinkProgress on February 6, 2019. Reprinted with permission. 

About the Author: Casey Quinlan is a policy reporter at ThinkProgress covering education and labor issues. Their work has also been published in The Establishment, Bustle, Glamour, The Guardian, and In These Times.

Secunda said that although the department will likely argue that these workers are entrepreneurs, there isn’t necessarily evidence to suggest that is how they should be characterized. Due to low pay, some drivers work extraordinarily long shifts.

“I think their entire emphasis here, entrepreneurial opportunity, brings the gig workforce into play,” Secunda said. “That term micro-entrepreneur — the idea that these people who are running their own little businesses — it’s hard to believe people are running businesses working 60 hours a week and making $10,000 a year. It doesn’t sound like a good entrepreneur to me. It sounds like an employee who is being exploited. But that’s their argument.”

This possible change would come after recent victories for businesses. In December, a federal appeals court ruled that an Obama-era standard that says joint employers can be held responsible for labor law violations and must bargain with contract workers’ unions was too broad. McDonald’s has been one of the companies at the center of this issue, after workers filed 291 complaints accusing the company of retaliation for a strike in the form of reduced work hours, disciplinary actions, and interrogations.

In September, the National Labor Relations Board issued a business-friendly proposed rule for an updated standard on joint employer status under the National Labor Relations Act. Under this rule, an employer is a joint employer “only if it possesses and exercises substantial, direct and immediate control over the essential terms and conditions of employment and… in a manner not limited and routine.”

The Labor Department plans to update the joint employer rule soon. The Labor Department has also recently moved to encourage states to conduct drug tests for people seeking unemployment insurance, which labor experts say would accomplish nothing but humiliation and more hoops for low-income people seeking relief.

Meanwhile, House Democrats are focusing on the Labor Department’s handling of its proposed tip-pooling rule, after reports that the department moved to hide findings that the rule would rob workers of billions of dollars every year. On Friday, Reps. Bobby Scott (D-VA), Keith Ellison (D-MN) Mark Takano (D-OR), and Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) askedfor all economic analyses of the rule. Democrats have also called for an investigation into Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta after a Miami Herald report on his role in securing a plea deal for multimillionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was able to avoid prison despite allegations that he sexually abused dozens of girls.

Uber And Lyft Drivers Organize To Fight Exploitation

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

“Gig economy” corporations depend on a low-wage economy in which lots of people are looking for ways to get by. Their business model requires disposable people willing to take low-wage jobs with long hours and no benefits so they can pay the rent, doing things for people who need to save as much as they can, so they can pay the rent.

For example, if you’re driving for “ride share” companies like Uber or Lyft, those companies are making serious money. Meanwhile you’re probably working a lot of hours just to make rent. You drive for them, you obviously are an employee, but they say are a “contractor.” Contractors are basically employees who don’t get benefits, have to pay much more into Social Security, have to withhold their own taxes and pay them quarterly, can’t claim unemployment, don’t get Workers Compensation if injured on the job and many other disadvantages. There isn’t even a limit on the hours they work and they can’t get overtime.

The drivers (and other “contractors” around the country) say they are employees and deserve the rights and benefits of employees. Uber and other big corporations that exploit their workers as a business model claim their employees are “contractors” with no rights. Various courts, agencies, departments, etc are working to determine if they will be classified as employees or contractors.

Uber and Lyft Drivers Fighting To Unionize

Uber and Lyft drivers are fighting to do something about this and the best way to do something when you are being exploited on the job is to join a union so you are not fighting alone. In New York, for example, 14,000 Uber and Lyft drivers have signed up to say they want to join the local Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) branch.

ATU’s website says,

“Founded in 1892, the ATU today is comprised of over 190,000 members, including: metropolitan, interstate, and school bus drivers; paratransit, light rail, subway, streetcar, and ferry boat operators; mechanics and other maintenance workers; clerks, baggage handlers, municipal employees, and others.”

Buzzfeed has the Uber/Lyft/ATU story, in Nearly 14,000 Uber And Lyft Drivers Sign Union Cards In New York

Nearly 14,000 Uber and Lyft drivers in New York have signed up to join the local branch of the Amalgamated Transit Union, according to a union spokesperson. The group plans to rally at the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) headquarters next week to demand a formal vote on unionizing.

The 14,000 sign-ups exceed the 30 percent threshold that federal regulators say must trigger an official vote, the union says. The cards signed by drivers indicate that they seek ATU membership and authorize the union to act as their collective bargaining agent.

The ATU’s Local 1181 is asking the Taxi and Limousine Commission (TCL) to force Uber and Lyft to allow a union vote. Crain’s New York Business explains why, in Union seeks to organize rideshare drivers in NYC,

In a letter to the commissioner that was delivered on Tuesday, Local 1181 President Michael Cordiello asked the TLC to “schedule and conduct a free and fair election for the drivers of these corporations to determine whether they choose to be represented” by the union.

“We make this demand in conformance with the stated mission of the TLC,” he wrote, citing its status as “the agency responsible for licensing and regulating” the city’s taxis and car services.

In an interview, Cordiello added that Tuesday’s rally was only the first step in the union’s strategy.

“There are a lot of other ways we can accomplish this, such as legislation,” he said in a reference to the ordinance passed in December in Seattle that entitled Uber and Lyft drivers to union representation. “We are unfolding what we believe will be a new direction for labor and for the technology work force.”

Drivers and the ATU Local held a rally Tuesday at the TLC office in Long Island City. Vice News covered that, in NYC Uber and Lyft drivers are protesting for union rights,

Drivers for the ride-hailing service Uber turned out in the streets of Queens on Tuesday morning, demanding their right to unionize outside the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission in Long Island City.

“We demand living wage fares, no pool fares, protection from exploitation, union representation,” read one big green sign held up by one Uber driver, a middle-aged black man with a tan jacket and blue pork pie hat.

The ride-share workers — categorized as “independent contractors” rather than employees by tech companies like Uber and Lyft — had joined up with the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1181, which represents city bus drivers. Copies of over 14,000 signed union cards sat in a fat bundle on the table in the center of the demonstration, 10,000 cards thicker since May.

The rally had the flavor of a protest,

It was an old-fashioned rally. The ride-share workers, joined by bus drivers, marched in front of the Taxi Commission barking out chants from a bullhorn. Cop cars flanked either side of the street as people who worked inside the Commission building slowed down to check out the protest.

A few passing Uber and Lyft drivers liked what they heard and waded into the demonstration to sign union cards.

“I support this,” said Jaydip Ray, 36, a skinny guy with a blue hoodie, moments after walking away from joining up, as another young man took his place. “We need benefits. Without benefits, we don’t have any future.”

The “gig economy” means that big corporations make billionaires, while their workers are called “contractors” who have no rights and don’t make squat. It’s one more way the system has been rigged.

This post originally appeared on ourfuture.org on September 30, 2016. Reprinted with Permission.

Dave Johnson has more than 20 years of technology industry experience. His earlier career included technical positions, including video game design at Atari and Imagic. He was a pioneer in design and development of productivity and educational applications of personal computers. More recently he helped co-found a company developing desktop systems to validate carbon trading in the US.

DOL Decision Could Mean the End of Wage Theft Through “Independent Contractor” Misclassification

Monday, July 27th, 2015

David MobergAre you an employee?

It seems like a simple question that must have a simple answer for most people. But definitions in different laws and rulings enforcing the laws vary. And that variation provides an opening for a growing number of employers to cheat governments of taxes and workers of income, benefits and protections by misclassifying their employees, especially as “independent contractors.”

Last week, the administrator of the Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division, David Weil, released a “letter of guidance” that clarifies who is an employee and who is an “independent contractor”—that is, essentially an individual running his or her own business. He argues that the most definitive statement from Congress comes from the Fair Labor Standards Act, which says that “to employ” means “to suffer or permit to work.” And, he concludes, “under the Act, most workers are employees.”

The decision is “incredibly important,” says Catherine Ruckelshaus, general counsel and program director of the National Employment Law Project (NELP), a pro-worker nonprofit organization, and may help to clear up confusion in the courts and encourage more enforcement of the law.

In recent years, many companies—from 10 percent to 30 percent or more of employers—employ at least several million people who are misclassified as independent contractors, according to a recent NELP report. They even go so far as to require workers to form a limited liability corporation or franchise (with themselves as the one and only participant) or to sign contracts declaring that they are independent contractors. According to another study from economist Jeffrey Eisenach of George Mason University, the number of independent contractors rose by one million from 2005 to 2010, including both fake and real contractors (often unemployed workers who re-label themselves as “consultants”).

One high-profile example is the Federal Express delivery driver—who wears a FedEx uniform, drives a company truck, follows a route set by the company and still is treated as a contractor. Weil’s ruling may also tip the judgment against companies like the Uber taxi service, increasingly targeted in lawsuits as improperly treating its drivers as independent contractors.

When employers misclassify workers, they often pay less for contractors, but most important, the workers lose a wide range of protections and benefits under the law such as unemployment compensation, workers’ compensation, minimum wage and overtime regulations, and governments lose billions of dollars a year in taxes that support those programs.

In his recent book The Fissured Workplace, Weil argues that workplace phenomena like subcontracting, using independent contractors, franchising and other ways to make employers less responsible for their employees is not just a result of competition driving down costs, whether as a result of globalization, weakening of unions, new technologies or new work processes, but also “pressure from public and private capital markets to improve returns.”

Unlike the “common law” test for who is an employer, which emphasizes the degree of control over one’s work, the FLSA standard usually relies on an “economic realities” test, which examines many different dimensions of work without favoring one above all others. But in his guidance letter, Weil writes, “the ultimate inquiry under the FLSA is whether the worker is economically dependent on the employer or truly in business for him or herself.” But the varied economic realities tested include such questions as how integral the worker is to the business, how much does managerial skill affect possible profit or loss, how big is the worker’s relative investment, does the worker’s success rely on special business skills in addition to any technical skills, what kind of control does the employer exercise, or how permanent is the relation of the worker to the employer.

The impact of this guidance letter may first be felt in courtrooms and in various federal or state agencies, but Ruckelshaus hopes that employers will voluntarily take it seriously. More likely, it will only be quite meaningful if there are systematic state and federal efforts to audit employer behavior, especially in industries where abuses are common, such as lower-skill construction, home care and janitorial work. Unions are also in a position to push for more vigorous enforcement, as Ruckelshaus said the Carpenters have been.

And when it is clear that the workers are not contractors but employees, the unions can do the workers a favor and invite them to join the union.

This blog was originally posted on In These Times on July 22, 2015. Reprinted with permission.

About the Author: The author’s name is David Moberg. David Moberg, a senior editor of In These Times, has been on the staff of the magazine since it began publishing in 1976. Before joining In These Times, he completed his work for a Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of Chicago and worked for Newsweek. He has received fellowships from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Nation Institute for research on the new global economy. He can be reached at davidmoberg@inthesetimes.com.

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