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Archive for the ‘Government Shutdown’ Category

USDA Does Not Have The Cash To Keep Food Stamps Running If The Government Shuts Down

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

AlanPyke_108x108Tens of millions of vulnerable Americans would lose their food stamps benefits if Republicans bent on defunding Planned Parenthood force the second government shutdown of the Obama era next week, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) warned on Tuesday.

Unlike the 2013 shutdown when cash reserves allowed Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to be disbursed as normal, “USDA will not have the funding necessary for SNAP benefits in October and will be forced to stop providing benefits within the first several days of October,” a spokeswoman told the Associated Press. The agency notified state SNAP administrators on Friday that they should not begin the process of doling out October’s food stamps dollars this week as they normally would.

Without a deal, funding for normal government operations will run out at the end of September. In response to the news that a shutdown would cut off food stamps to as many as 45 million people, Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (R-KS) issued a statement saying the way to avoid a shutdown is for Democrats to get on board with cutting off federal funding for women’s healthcare. “The best way to ensure SNAP recipients receive needed support is to vote for the [continuing resolution],” Roberts told the Huffington Post. “I’m prepared to do so, and if members are worried about SNAP funding, they should too.”

The funding measure Roberts referenced would zero out federal funds to Planned Parenthood, the national women’s health organization that’s been smeared by pro-life activists as improperly profiting off the sale of aborted fetal tissue. Many of Roberts’ House colleagues have pledged to shut down the government if the group doesn’t have its funding cut off. State lawmakers in some parts of the country have already moved to restrict the group’s ability to provide a wide range of health services to low-income women who depend on Planned Parenthood clinics. In a quarter of all the counties where the group has a presence, the clinics are the only source of affordable contraceptive services for women of little means.

The 2013 government shutdown caused disruptions in a variety of federal services including thejob training programs that unemployed people rely on to fulfill the eligibility requirements of SNAP. But the money for food itself was able to continue flowing because the USDA had sufficient cash in reserve to put the appropriate funds on peoples’ cards. That isn’t the case this time, lawmakers briefed by the agency say.

Cutting off SNAP would mean shooting the U.S. economy in the foot. The benefits more than pay for themselves, generating close to two dollars of economic activity for every dollar of benefits doled out by the USDA. Plugging up the flow of money from the federal government to low-income families to the grocery stores where they shop would have ripple effects on businesses and on tax revenue for public coffers.

The timing of the possible shutdown would exacerbate that natural chain of harmful knock-on effects. Most SNAP beneficiaries have already spent down their full monthly benefit by about midway through any given month. That cycle puts a crunch on grocery stores as well, distorting the hours they can sensibly schedule workers to be in the store and shifting how they stock their shelves. The USDA’s early warning about SNAP being cut off may have some political ramifications in the Congressional tussle over government funding, but it also serves as a more practical heads-up to the economic ecosystem surrounding the food stamps program.

This blog was originally posted on Think Progress on September 23, 2015. Reprinted with permission.

About the Author: Alan Pyke is the Deputy Economic Policy Editor for ThinkProgress.org. Before coming to ThinkProgress, he was a blogger and researcher with a focus on economic policy and political advertising at Media Matters for America, American Bridge 21st Century Foundation, and PoliticalCorrection.org. He previously worked as an organizer on various political campaigns from New Hampshire to Georgia to Missouri. His writing on music and film has appeared on TinyMixTapes, IndieWire’s Press Play, and TheGrio, among other sites.

 

The Shutdown: How It Hurt, What We Learned, Where We Go from Here

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

seiu-org-logoFor working people across the country, the week ends with a mix of relief and frustration.

The hundreds of thousands of federal workers who had been furloughed during the 16-day government shutdown were glad to return to their jobs, freed from the anxiety of not knowing when they’d get another paycheck.

SEIU appreciates the strong stand President Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and others took to defend the Affordable Care Act. And now, a window is open for negotiations on reversing the devastating sequester before the next round of cuts, scheduled for January.

At the same time, we can’t ignore that the shutdown hit working families hard. It did real damage–costing the economy $24 billion, according to Standard & Poor’s. That’s a staggering impact from what SEIU President Mary Kay Henry called a “crisis manufactured by the far-right wing of the Republican Party.”

That number–$24 billion–is unimaginably big, so consider one person’s story: LaShante Austin, a member of SEIU 32BJ, told MSNBC if the shutdown had not ended, she was not going to be able to pay rent. “I have got to put food on the table. I can’t tell the bill collectors, ‘Sorry, the government’s shut down,'” she said. Austin is a security officer at the Statue of Liberty, a symbol of American greatness.

Don’t working people like LaShante Austin deserve better from America’s leaders?

Congress must now debate and pass a budget to fund the federal government in the new year. A bipartisan committee with members from both the House and the Senate has until mid-December to issue recommendations. If the committee fails, the government could shut down again Jan. 15 and the debt ceiling could be reached Feb. 7.

This committee must meet its deadline, but it must also resist making decisions that would continue to fund vital services at austerity levels. Nor should members of Congress try to undermine retirement security in pursuit of a bogus “grand bargain.” We must work to change the economic narrative and reverse the politics of austerity. The shutdown is over, but the fight continues to improve the lives of working people. Sign up to receive updates as the budget committee gets to work.

Averting the crisis has also given Washington, D.C., the chance to focus again on immigration reform–something President Obama pledged this week to do.

The time is now for commonsense immigration reform, and you can add your voice!

SEIU, Reform Immigration For America (RI4A) and the Campaign for Community Change are taking the fight to social networks in a big way. Join us in calling on Home Depot, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Dominos to use their influence to build support for immigration reform.

This article was originally printed on SEIU on October 18, 2013.  Reprinted with permission.

Author: SEIU Communications.

It’s the Final Countdown: How the Government Shutdown Affects Labor and Employment Law

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

HymanJonathanTIn case you haven’t heard, as of 12:01 a.m. this morning, the federal government is closed. Your business will feel this shutdown in many ways, including in your interactions with the federal agencies that enforce the various labor and employment laws. Each has posted on its website a contingency plan for operations during the shutdown.

For example, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission:

  1. Will accept and docket new charges, and examine if immediate injunctive relief is necessary.
  2. Will not conduct any investigations.
  3. Will not mediate any charges.
  4. Will not have staff available to answer questions or respond to correspondence.
  5. Will not litigate, unless a court denies a request for extension of time.
  6. Will not process any FOIA requests.

The Department of Labor and the National Labor Relations Board have each posted their own detailed shutdown plans. The bottom line, however, is that except for services that are absolutely essential, federal agencies will be closed until Congress works out its financial issues.

Federal courts, meanwhile, will remain open for business as usual for at least 10 business days, after which the Judiciary will reassess the situation.

Other federal services impacting employers that will be temporarily shuttered include e-Verify and the IRS.

While it difficult to predict how long this shutdown will last.The last shutdown of the federal government, spanning the end of 1995 to the beginning of 1996, lasted 28 days.

For now, if you have active matters with any federal agencies, expect for them to be on hold. Please remember is that while the EEOC and other agencies might be temporarily out of business, the laws that they enforce are not.

This article was originally printed on Ohio Employer’s Law Blog on October 1, 2013.  Reprinted with permission.

About the Author: Jonathan Hyman is a partner in the Labor & Employment group of Kohrman Jackson & Krantz.

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