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Archive for the ‘bonuses’ Category

Unemployment: Why Won’t Congress Talk About It!?

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

Change to WinAn interesting look at the unemployment rate. “What is currently a temporary long-term unemployment problem runs the risk of morphing into a permanent and costly increase in the unemployment rate” unless Congress takes action to create jobs. 

Why the Unemployment Rate Is So High – New York Times

Unemployment claims have increased slightly. “The Labor Department says applications rose 4,000 to a seasonally adjusted 371,000, the most in five weeks.”

Unemployment claims rise slightly in latest week – USA Today

“We need to avoid a lost generation of young people who will be playing economic catch-up their whole lives. We cannot stop pressing our leaders to help struggling poor and middle-class Americans.”

Crowdsourcing our economic recovery – CNN 

Even though the economy is improving, we need to do more to ensure the long term unemployed get back on their feet. Long term unemployment makes it harder and harder to provide for one’s family, and causes dramatic increases in mental illness. It’s time Washington gets busy putting people back to work. 

Long-Term Unemployed Winning Jobs Or Giving Up? – Huffington Post

This article was originally posted by ChangeToWin on January 11, 2013. Reprinted with Permission.

About the Author: Change to Win is an organization created by over 5.5 million workers – if corporations can join together to hire an army of lobbyists, working and middle class Americans must also band together and restore balance by making sure we have a strong voice and a seat at the table again.

(Colleen Gartner is an intern at Workplace Fairness.)

Broward Is Second Florida County to Address Wage Theft

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Kenneth Quinnell

This week, Broward County—one of the most populous counties in South Florida—became the second county in the state to pass a local wage theft ordinance, joining Miami-Dade County. In a 7-2 vote, the Board of County Commissioners voted to create the new law to deal with a significant and growing problem in Florida. Wage theft occurs when workers are not paid overtime, not paid at least the minimum wage, are forced to work off the clock or are not paid at all for work they have completed.

“I was at the meeting yesterday asking commissioners to vote yes for the ordinance, speaking on behalf of my close friends who are victims of wage theft in our county and haven’t been able to recover their wages after months of effort,” says Maria Isabel Fernandez, a resident of Dania Beach in Broward County. “I was thrilled when the ordinance passed! It may be too late for my friends, but it will help other people like them in the future who will now have the possibility of recovering the salaries they earned through their work without having to hire a lawyer and wait months without any income.”

Florida is considered one of the worst states in the country for wage theft, and Broward County is the third worst county in the state. Nearly 5,000 wage theft cases have been reported in Broward in the past three years, totaling more than $2 million in back wages. More than $28 million in unpaid wages have been recovered in Florida. Miami-Dade created a similar ordinance in 2010 and has recovered more than half a million dollars in unpaid wages in that county alone.

Several factors contribute to the problem. Florida does not have a state-level Department of Labor, has a high percentage of workers who are not covered by federal wage and hour laws and has a legislature that is openly hostile to wage theft laws, so much so that it recently tried to ban such laws at the local level.

Cynthia Hernandez of the Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy at Florida International University says:

Policymakers need to consider the ramifications of Florida becoming a glaring example of a state that tolerates and even encourages wage violations. Broward County and Miami-Dade’s wage theft ordinances are examples of good government policy addressing this growing issue. These ordinances are critical to maintaining a fairly competitive business environment so critical to Florida’s economy.

Alachua County, where Gainesville and the University of Florida reside, is considering becoming the third county to pass a wage theft ordinance. For more information or to report wage theft in Florida, contact the Florida Wage Theft Task Force.

This post was originally posted on AFL-CIO NOW on Monday, October 29, 2012. Reprinted with permission.

About the Author: Kenneth Quinnell is is senior writer for AFL-CIO. He is originally from Florida and is the father of three sons. He can be reached at Kquinnell@aflcio.org.

Time For More Executive Hard Time?

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Image: Bob RosnerAngelo Mozilo, co-founder of Countrywide Financial, a.k.a. No-Income-is-too-Small-For-Us-to-Give-You-a-Mortgage, agreed to pay $67.5 million dollars to avoid a federal civil fraud suit about to go to trial.

I know what you’re thinking, let’s hold a bake sale for Angelo. He clearly must be hurting. But chances are slim that you’ll see him at any soup kitchen, because he pocketed many times that amount of money in salary and perks before he drove his company into the ditch.

But it does raise an interesting question: Why isn’t the government going after Lehman, WAMU and other high flying executives from corporations that went into the toilet over the past few years? Especially when top executives pocketed so much cash from the deception and fake profits?

We’re not talking Salem Witch Trials. I’m simply suggesting that we start skimming off some of the cash that these executives skimmed off of all of us. I know this sounds drastic, but the top guys from Enron actually went to jail for their misdeeds.

Why are we suddenly so timid when it comes to the billions that these fat cats are sitting on?

This is especially confusing to me because of the rush by State Attorney’s General to sue over the recently enacted health care reform bill. Why aren’t our public officials going after the banking swindlers for the huge stockpiles of money that they extracted from all of us?

I would have thought that Attorneys General would at least understand the Willie Sutton rule. Mr. Sutton, the famous bank robber was asked why he robbed banks. He replied, “Because that is where the money is.”

Isn’t it time that we went where the money went? Anything short of a major offensive here sends a simple message to all that crime pays. That would be the worst message to come out of the pain of the past few years.

About The Author: Bob Rosner is a best-selling author and award-winning journalist. For free job and work advice, check out the award-winning workplace911.com. Check the revised edition of his Wall Street Journal best seller, “The Boss’s Survival Guide.” If you have a question for Bob, contact him via bob@workplace911.com.

Three Concepts That Need to Be 'Laid Off'

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

It’s time to review three ideas that need to be “let go” in 2009.

1. Credit Checks of Job Applicants. According to the Society of Human Resource Management and Kroll, 43% of employers run credit checks on potential employees, up from 36% in 2004. These checks involve rent, student loans, credit cards and mortgages and can make the difference between someone getting hired or having their application tossed.

In the best of times this is a dubious measurement to use when looking to hire someone. But given the rapidly increasing foreclosure rate, ballooning credit card debt and the general demise of capitalism as we’ve know it, credit checks of job applicants are a joke. A very bad joke.

I’d make an exception for people who handle substantial amounts of money as part of doing their jobs, but for a truck driver, administrative assistant or nurse, this is unnecessary. Personally, I believe that it violates our 4th Amendment right against cruel and unusual punishment and this is coming from a guy with a good credit score.

Let’s stop pouring salt in the wounds of our fellow citizens. Credit checks are wrong in the hiring process and need to be stopped.

2. Bonus Formulas. It seems every day that pigs can fly, at least on Wall Street. One day we hear from the President about $18 billion in bonus payments at companies receiving TARP government bailout bucks. Then the next day the headline is that 700 Merrill Lynch workers

received million dollar bonus payments each.

Clearly this proves that there is a parallel universe, one where pigs party like crazy. I think we need to toss all the old bonus formulas and swap them for calculations that actually don’t reward people when the markets sink by 50%. Is that too much to ask?

I’m all for pay for performance, but Wall Street seems to focus on the wrong “p” in the first part of this sentence at the expense of the second “p.”

3. Retirement. Ouch. Retirement has been pushed back for many of us. Instead of kicking back in our early 60s, many of us will now be working until our 70’s. We’ll have no choice.

We might not have a choice about how long we work, but we do have a choice about where we work. That’s why it’s so important to really focus on what we want to do with our careers, to decide what is meaningful and important to each of us.

And this may be the silver lining of the current mess. That it could push many people into jobs that hold more meaning for them.

As a special guest this week, we’re bringing in the star of the Apprentice, and former high roller, to bid adieu to credit checks, bonus formulas and retirement.

Donald: “You’re fired!”

Rosner: “Thanks Mr. Trump.”

About the Author: Bob Rosner is a best-selling author, award-winning journalist and contributor to On The Money. He has been called “Dilbert with a solution.” Check out the free resources available at workplace911.com. You can contact Bob via bob@workplace911.com.

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